Kenneth Roberts in the Blogosphere: Historical Novels on “Arundel”

This morning while trolling Google for anything Kenneth Roberts related, I came across a great blog titled “Historical Novels.” According to the welcome message on the home page, the site “may interest those who enjoy historical fiction AND take the history seriously. I confess that I’m the sort who is outraged when a new historical novel or film takes liberties with known historical facts – for no good reason (sometimes there are good reasons). To that end, novels are rated on five criteria – posed as questions.”

I’ve actually been thinking lately of reading more historical fiction novels, but I’ll be honest, I’m rather hesitant to do so because I am unfamiliar with any other historical fiction writer. Hopefully, this blog can rescue me from the doldrums of ignorance.

Back in 2011, “Historical Novels” provided a favorable post for Kenneth Roberts’ Arundel, which you can read here. A link is also provided for what looks to be a very promising website: historicalnovels.info – a website that lists over 5000 historical novels.

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2 Responses

  1. Hi Danny, I recently saw an episode of Super Soul Sunday where Oprah was interviewing Steven Pressfield. I was greatly impressed by some of the things he said, although I had never heard of him before. Since then I have started reading his non-fiction book, but he is known for his historical fiction. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Pressfield.

    Here are a couple of quotes from the book I am reading:

    “It’s not the writing part that’s hard. What’s hard is sitting down to write.” “If you find yourself asking yourself (and your friends), “Am I really a writer? Am I really an artist?” chances are you are. The counterfeit innovator is wildly self-confident. The real one is scared to death.”
    ― Steven Pressfield, The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles

    • Thank you for your comment! I’ll definitely check him out. I particularly like the title of the book you’re reading: “War of Art.” Writing, like other art, is like a war – it’s a war with your inertia. Thanks for sharing!

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